Saturday, July 7, 2012

Teaching Money in First Grade

Books to help teach counting, savings and spending  with coins to first graders:

The Penny Pot. By Stuart J. Murphy. Illus. by Lynne Cravath. (1998). Harper Collins, (0-06-0446717). 33 p. Gr. 1-3.


This book starts at a school fair.  A student who has just spent her money on an ice cream cone decides that she would like to get her face painted.  The teacher offers her the pennies that people put in the pot.  Fortunately, some people drop larger denominations coins.  The coins are counted and shown on the pages so that you can track her growing tally. The story is charming and gives a counting lesson each time more money is added.  Will she finally gather enough coins to be able to get her face painted?



You Can't Buy a Dinosaur with a Dime.  By Harriet Ziefert. Illus. by Amanda Haley. (2011).
Blue Apple Books, (978-160905464). 32 p. Gr. 1-3. 

Pete is savings his money.  He decides to spend most of it on a dinosaur but then starts rethinking his purchase.  He make a new goal and decides to start again.  Even though this book does include dollars, it's a great idea for topics in writing..how do you decide what you can afford, how do you make money, when is a good time to buy, and how do you keep track of what you earn?



Jelly Beans for Sale. By Bruce McMillan. Photos by author. (1996). Scholastic Press, (978-0590865845). 32 p. Gr. 1-2.

This book is full of fun colorful photos of real kids!  The borders of the pages are also surrounded by jelly beans.  Each two page spread shows a child buying jellybeans with coins.  The first purchase shows a child buying one jelly bean for one penny.  As the book progresses, a combination of coins is used.  




The Counting Book. By Rozanne Lanczak Williams. (2001). Charlesbridge Publishers,  (978-0881063264). 32 p. Gr. 1-2.

Rhyme  and clearly shot photographs allow children to practice their counting skills in this book. Each coin is introduced and then shown in a variety of visuals to make other coin values.  By the end of the book, the author is guiding the reader to making combinations of coins adding up to  a dollar.





Websites for Teaching Coin Counting to First Graders:

http://www.toonuniversity.com/flash.asp?err=569 This site shows an animated barrel with a spout attached.  At the top of the page is a box with an amount listed in cents.  The bottom of the page gives pictures of a penny, nickel, dime and quarter.  The object is to click and drag the coins to the top of the spout.  As the coin rolls down, you will hear a noise and the front of the barrel will show the amount the student has rolled into the barrel.  This is a fun game that can be done independently.

http://www.abcya.com/counting_money.htm The game on this site begins with a choice of counting coins only or a combination of both coins and paper bills.  The object is to click and drag the amount shown in the box.  When you are correct, a fish tank appears and a fish begins swimming around.  Your goal is to collect 10 fish!  If you guess wrong you lose a fish.  The opportunities to make combinations of coins is unlimited.  Once the student is introduced, it is totally independent.  If the student completes, they can go to a more complicated level which combines dollars.  Allows for more challenge for faster learners. 

http://www.hbschool.com/activity/counting_money/ This site is great for the beginner or the student who needs a little practice with penny, nickel and dime before adding in the quarter. The student counts the amount then types it in.  If the student is incorrect, they will be told  to try again.  If they are correct, it will tell them so and allow them to advance.  After about 10 activities, a short 30 second video cartoon appears and then gives them the option to start again.  Very easy and totally independent.

http://fen.com/studentactivities/Piggybank/piggybank.html This game allows for different levels of learner.  When the game begins, a choice is offered to choose easy or hard.  An easy selection will bring up a piggy bank with coins that drop into slots similar to a checkers game.  As the student selects and clicks on a coin, it will be added to the bank. The bank will then give a new amount to collect. The student will click on new coins to add up to the amount.  As they correctly identify the coins and amounts, the pig fills up!  The student can try again if they run out of time.  Indpendent and easy.

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